Parenting

15 easy ways to help boost your baby’s IQ

We all know that reading to your baby from birth is important, but what other ways can you mentally stimulate your baby? Here are 15 simple things you can do every day to potentially boost your baby’s IQ.

15 Easy Ways To Build Your Baby's IQ15 Easy Ways To Build Your Baby's IQ

1. Cuddle monster

We’re wired to seek safety and if a baby doesn’t feel safe, it can’t learn. Lots of love and cuddles will help establish a child’s sense of security.

2. Give options

Present your older baby with options. For instance, give your baby two types of toys or books to choose from and use the one they touch or seem fixated on.

3. Hide-and-seek

Use your hands to cover your face and then move them. This reminds baby that items or people that disappear can come back.

4. Get outside

The sights, the smells and even fresh air will stimulate baby’s sense. It’s also a good way for you to get some incidental exercise or fit in a quick five-minute workout.

5. Tickle toes

Eating Well Once Your Baby Is Born

Games such as ‘this little piggy’ helps to build up anticipation and is a great way to make baby laugh. While you’re at it try two little dicky birds!

6. Sing

It doesn’t matter if you’re not Celine Dion, just sing to your fave tunes on the radio or even classic nursery rhymes.

7. Count aloud

This is a case of monkey see, monkey do, if you count toes or fingers when washing or dressing baby. One day they’ll join in!

8. Talk about your day

It might seem silly when baby can’t respond, but research shows the more words a child hears before the age of 3 the higher their IQ.

9. Give baby a mirror

15 Easy Ways To Build Your Baby's IQ

As well as being adorable to watch as they smile at themself in the mirror, it’s also a great way to help baby focus.

10. Point

It’s been found that kids learn language quicker if parents and caregivers points to an object when talking about it.

11. Use gentle tone

Even if you’re cranky and feel grumpy, use that baby-friendly high pitched tone. It makes the vowel sounds more distinct and it’s easier for baby to imitate.

12. Ditch screens

It’s been suggested by researcher that personal interactions and conversations are a lot more beneficial to a child’s brain development than a television show or iPad game.

13. Be attentive

Mother and baby

Sure it’s not always possible to attend to every whim, especially if you’ve got other children. However, when a baby cries it’s because they are communicating a need to you. The sooner this is met, the sooner they will learn they can depend on you.

14. Embrace the ‘pick up’ game

It can get frustrating picking up an item that has been dropped on purpose dozens of times. But baby is learning cause and effect and will soon look for items on the ground!

15. Another language

If a caregiver or parent speak another language, get them to speak it to your baby. Encouraging a child to be bilingual can encourage parallel thinking.

Finally, enjoy those lazy days with your baby, for they will soon be running about the house causing chaos!

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emily-toxward
written by:

Emily Toxward

When former journalist Emily Toxward isn’t wrangling her three kids she’s juggling the demands writing and failing fabulously at being a domestic goddess. A published writer for nearly 20 years, Emily left full-time work in 2008 to have children and write from home. Always on the go, she spends her days negotiating with an army of little people she created and visits her local Gold Coast beaches for a little sanity.